How to prepare for interview success.

University of Manchester Careers Blog

 interview queueWhether you have had an interview before or not it’s always nerve racking when you get the call / email inviting you to come along.  The more you want the job the more daunting it feels!

Interviews can be: Competency based, Strength basedTechnicalBy Phone, Video or Skype, Panel, 1-1, a chat over a coffee or incredibly formal.

There are lots of different ways to interview but essentially the employer is always looking for the same thing.

  1. Someone who understands what the job involves and wants to do it!
  2. Someone who can demonstrate that they have the right skill set to be able to do the job.

The good news is if you have been invited to interview the employer already thinks you CAN do the job.  Now they need to see which candidate would be best.

Motivational questions

  • These look at your reasoning for why you want…

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An Era Ends at the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant — U.S. NRC Blog

Victor Dricks Senior Public Affairs Officer Region IV Shortly before 1 p.m. Monday, operators in the control room of the Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant pushed a red button, initiating an automatic shutdown of the reactor. So ended commercial operations for the nation’s smallest nuclear power plant, located along the Missouri River, about 20 miles […]

via An Era Ends at the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant — U.S. NRC Blog

Sharing a job interview experience

I had an interview for the lecturer opening at the M. P. Birla Planetarium on the 15 of February, 2016. I spent two days preparing for the interview. In this blog entry, I am sharing my experience with the audience, thus they can get an idea of how it went.

February 15 was a Monday. I was asked to show up at 2:00 pm. I got there at 1:45 pm. I showed my call letter at the main entrance of the planetarium. I was asked to have a seat in the seminar room at the planetarium. There were two other applicants waiting there already. I was called in at 2:25 pm.

There were four people at the interview panel. The first interviewer asked me to introduce myself. He also asked me a few follow up questions. Dr. Duari, the director of the planetarium, asked me a few technical questions to check my knowledge of Astronomy and Physics. He first asked me where the headquarter of the IAU (International Astronomical Union) was located. Then, he asked me whether I had heard about finding an evidence of the gravitational wave and what exactly it was. The third interviewer asked me where I reside and how long it took me to get there. The fourth interviewer asked me about my computer skills. I was done with the interview at 3:00 pm.

Overall, it went well. I was offered the job on the 25 of February, 2016. I turned down the offer due to career advancement obligations. If I had to go through the same set of questions, I would probably invest time on preparing a good introduction about myself. I think my introduction was sketchy because I did not get to highlight some of my major accomplishments.

Scholarships for Masters in Physics, Astronomy and Quantum Technology at Sussex

In the Dark

Although I’m in the middle of a very busy day (with no time for a lunch break) I thought I’d take a few minutes to advertise a very special one-off opportunity. As many of you will be aware, the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced in the Autumn Statement last year that loans of up to £10,000 would be made available to students on postgraduate (Masters) courses from 2016/17 onwards.  Welcome though this scheme may be it does not apply to students wanting to start a Masters programme this September (i.e. for Academic Year 2015/16).

But fear not. The University of Sussex has come to the rescue! Last week the University unveiled a generous new funding scheme to bridge the gap. In particular, a huge  boost to the University’s flagship Chancellor’s Masters Scholarships means that 100 students graduating this summer with a first-class degree from any UK university will be eligible…

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Failed Bolts Bedevil a Nuclear Plant

U.S. NRC Blog

Neil Sheehan
Public Affairs Officer
Region I

Truly novel issues are, generally speaking, few and far between at U.S. nuclear power plants. Whether it’s a specific type of pipe that springs a leak or an electrical relay that goes on the fritz, chances are good that the problem has been experienced before somewhere across the nation’s fleet of commercial power reactors during the many decades they have been in operation.

An issue that has drawn attention at the Salem Unit 2 nuclear power plant, a pressurized-water reactor in southern New Jersey, has to do with the failure of small bolts contained in four reactor coolant pumps. The bolts, measuring 1 inch in diameter and 4 inches in length, are used to secure a turning vane inside the pumps.

These pumps stand about 30 feet tall and provide forced flow of coolant, or water, through the reactor to transport heat from…

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